Dog Pulling on Leash 3 Tips

 

3 Tips to Stop Your Dog Pulling On Leash

 

Is your dog pulling on a leash? Well, here’s three tips that’ll help you solve that problem.

Stop Your Dog Pulling on leash Rule Number One:   Have the right equipment.

Use a six foot leash, standard leash, no Flexi’s or anything like that, and either a gentle leader or an Easy Walk harness. These work best to stop your dog pulling on leash.

Here you see Keeper wearing an Easy Walk harness. That’s the easiest for me to handle him.

 

Stop Pulling on Leash Rule Number Two:   Make left turns and circles.

Now I say left turns if your dog is on your left, this is my left, then you do left turns into your dog.

Left turns go back in the opposite direction and circles to the left, your herding your dog, keeping him on the inside like that as you make your turns and, or circles.

That’s critical. If you do the opposite direction, turn away from your dog, he is on the outside and has control.

When you turn into your dog, no matter whether it’s a right turn for you or a left turn for me, turn into your dog like that.

Now here’s the key with that, if you do it abruptly … The quicker you do it, the more he pays attention to you.

It’s almost like you forgot to signal your turn and already starts staying back a little bit so he can kind of watch you, so that’s important.

Okay, so left turns and circles. Okay, and I do the circles if I have a dog that’s really trying to pull out on a leash quite a bit,

then I’ll just do some two or three circles and then do a straight line for about four to five steps and then I’ll do a left turn again into my dog.

 

Dog Pulling On Leash Rule Number Three: Frequent sits on your walks.

What we’re talking about here folks is to be able to stop your straight-line walking, because it  creates the problems that you’re having. Instead, do your left turns in circles, now introduce your frequent sits on your straightaways.

You walk straight, four to six paces and you sit your dog. Walk another four to six paces, sit your dog.

Four to six paces, sit your dog. Four to six paces, make a left turn, come back, sit your dog, you see what I’m getting at?

Now your dog is paying attention. If he’s paying attention to you, he’s not pulling.

Okay so, it just makes sense to do those second and third tips separately and then combine them together so that you have a really enjoyable and meaningful walk with your dog where he’s paying attention to you on the walk.

Now, once you have your dogs attention with your left turns, circles, and sits, resume your normal dog walks and put your new strategies into place if your dog starts to pull again.

Just make it quick and abrupt to regain your dogs attention. I’m Jim Burwell. Keeper and I can still be found at petiquettedog.com.

4 replies
  1. Jim Burwell
    Jim Burwell says:

    The three things I mentioned were: Gentle Leader and an Easy Walk Harnass and a 6 foot leash (NO retractables). I mentioned those because that is what works best.

  2. Kathy Spera
    Kathy Spera says:

    Jim and Keeper : Thanks so much for this tio-an invaluable lesson whether you have a young or old dog. One question I did have was whether or not a harness or a collar is preferred in conjunction with the 6′ leash or is that more of personal preference or dependent on how the dog responds to each type of walking accoutrement? Thanks again for all your help 🙂

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