Happy Ending For Family’s Dog Biting Problem With 9-Month-Old Puppy

Puppy Biting Family Members

 

Some time ago I received a call from a client who was concerned about her 9-month-old puppy biting family members and friends.  There had been a couple of instances where this had occurred.

On my first visit I was to meet with both the husband and the wife – and the dog of course. But when I arrived at their home for our session, the wife was home and the husband was on the way home from the office. So I asked her to put her pup on a leash, unlock the door and I would let myself in while she focused on controlling her dog.

 A Lunging, Barking Growling Puppy Ready to Bite

I was met immediately with lunging, barking and growling by their dog that was fortunately held at bay by the wife. We sat across the room from each other as I began to click and treat the dog without making direct eye contact with him.   You could begin to see a definite shift in his attitude towards me. Within the next 5 minutes the husband got home and we started the session.

The Biting, Rowdy Puppy Has Not Been Taught Any Manners or Rules

  • A detailed evaluation revealed that there was no structure in the home for the dog:
  • He was not required to do much of anything except get petted by the owners – especially the wife.
  • The dog also shared their bed with them at night, placing himself square in the middle of the bed.
  • He gets a fair amount of exercise with walks but he lunges at people passing by.

He does attend a doggie day camp several times a week as well where he is great with the people once he is at doggie day camp— which is on neutral territory with no owners present.

I  Noticed a Lot Missing in the Way of Balancing the Relationship with their Biting Puppy

I immediately had them put their dog on a learn-to-earn program.

Every single thing he wanted he had to earn it by doing sits and downs.

This began to set a strong foundation of leadership, thereby giving him a better understanding of who’s doing what for whom while at the same time providing him with a function in the group.

Now it was Time to Address the Problem of the Biting

I wanted to be able to show the relevance of the unbridled love and affection the wife had poured onto this pup

 I had them tether him to the stair banister with his 6’ leash.

When we did this, he pulled fully extending the leash trying to get to Mom!

I had her stand just about 1 foot further away from him.

I let her know that I was going to come up and hug her.

When I hugged her, he lunged, growled and barked.

I then had her husband take her place and I approached him giving him a hug with no reaction from the dog.

A Big Reason They Had A Biting Dog Was Now Very Clear

  • In addition to putting their dog on the earn-to-learn program I also suggested:
  • For a few weeks, the wife throttle way back on her involvement with the dog so that the husband could then start feeding, training and exercising the dog.
  • She, on the other hand, was to only interact when she had to feed if her husband was working late and couldn’t feed.
  • The idea was to balance the owner-dog relationship more by prioritizing the husband’s role of leader and later bring her back into the picture with new rules about her relationship with her dog.

It has taken about 10 weeks of consistent work on this program as well as bringing family members and friends back into the home to complete the behavior modification exercises. I love happy endings and am delighted that this has turned out beautifully.

(C) Jim Burwell 2010

Your Dog Training Questions: My Puppy Bites Me

Your Question:

Jim,

I have a new puppy. She is a 6-month-old Maltese. We are potty training her, socializing her with our friends and generally following all of your advice. Everything seems fine, except that when we are pet her and play with her she bites and sometimes her bites are way too hard. Will she grow out of this?

My Answer:
If you have ever observed puppies in a litter, you will see a lot of play fighting, including biting. This is how puppies teach each other something we call bite inhibition. If one puppy bites too hard during play, the other will yelp to let him know. Soon puppies learn how to control the strength of their bites, but sometimes they have to learn this from you.

The first thing is to never punish your puppy for biting. Don’t strike or yell at the puppy. First of all, it won’t work and second, you could compound the problem by creating fear in your puppy. Instead you want to supervise your puppy and eventually redirect the biting.

When your puppy bites, stop playing and redirect their behavior. If you have been teaching obedience teaching your dog commands like sit, down, etc., this is the time for them. Keep up the good work with training, walking and socializing your puppy and you should have no problem getting your puppy to stop biting you.

Jim’s  Nose to Tail Puppy Training is the culmination of these years of training into an easy, step-by-step process so that your puppy understands what you expect of him because you know how to teach him.  You empower him to be able to give you the behavior you want and you empower him to be successful at living in a human home.  The result – one awesome puppy and one happy family.

(C) Jim Burwell 2010

Your Dog Training Questions: How Can I Let My Puppy Know When Behavior Is Bad?

I’ve said time and time again that you need to be a leader to your puppy for him to understand what kind of behavior you expect. But how do you communicate this to a puppy? After all, you can’t reason with your puppy. But don’t worry, because it’s not as hard as you think.

Your Question:

You’ve said before that you can’t scold a puppy. So, if I can’t scold the puppy, what do I do?

– Jennifer

My Answer:

To potty train your puppy correctly, you must be proactive and not reactive. What this means is you must take the time to do what needs to be done so your puppy has NO accidents. It won’t be enough for you to react negatively to every accident for your puppy to understand what you want.

Part of the reason for this is that dogs have very short attention spans. Puppies and dogs only have a 1 to 1.5 second window of opportunity after they take an action for you to be able to praise or correct them effectively. After that short window, they will simply be unable to understand what you are trying to tell them. They will literally be clueless to what they did a few seconds before and therefore won’t understand why they are being praised or told “no.” Knowing this, you can understand how confusing this must be for a dog.

It’s important to understand this about dogs: even if you can catch them in the act, scolding just won’t work. The only way for your puppy to succeed is to set them up for success. A regular schedule of feeding, exercise and trips outside is how you accomplish this.

Jim’s  Nose to Tail Puppy Training is the culmination of these years of training into an easy, step-by-step process so that your puppy understands what you expect of him because you know how to teach him.  You empower him to be able to give you the behavior you want and you empower him to be successful at living in a human home.  The result – one awesome puppy and one happy family.


(C) Jim Burwell 2010

What’s YOUR dog training question?
Use the comments below to ask .

Puppy Training Secrets: Food Matters. A lot.

Don’t you wish your new puppy came with a manual that told you exactly how to train a puppy? A puppy’s natural activities of running, chasing, biting, chewing, peeing, pooping, jumping, digging and barking can take you to the edge of your sanity if you are not prepared to deal with them. The truth is your new puppy doesn’t know anything about living with you or any other human.

Remember, your puppy came straight to you from living with its littermates. The litter was probably kept outside or in the garage and allowed to pee and poop everywhere! Or, you puppy came to you from a shelter because the original owner either was too lazy and stuck the puppy out in the back yard, or didn’t really know the correct way to make a puppy successful at living in a home. Now it’s up to you. You must teach them how to co-exist with humans — peacefully — so that all family members can enjoy your new family member.

Training a puppy not to pee or poop in your home is perhaps one of, if not, the highest priority concerns of most new puppy owners. Not just stopping accidents, but preventing them in the first place! Can you imagine never having a single potty accident because you’ve learned how to housebreak your puppy – and with no potty accidents? This is very possible. It comes down to understand the few simple things you can do to be proactive in your puppy training instead of being reactive. Just think how less stressful that will be on your puppy and you!

I’d like to share a secret with you that few trainers teach. Food can play a huge role in expediting your house breaking process. What’s so important about food? Every aspect of food is critical, everything from what kind of food, the ingredients (the order of ingredients) as well as the ingredients themselves. All of this information actually gives clues as to the value of the food you’ve just purchased. Also, how much food and believe it or not – how you prepare it. If you know what ingredients make up a high quality dog food, it will expedite your puppy’s housebreaking process, your puppy’s rowdy behavior. Yes, the food you feed your puppy has a major impact on his behavior. The food you feel also affects your puppy’s quality of life, thus preventing you from being faced with months of frustration.

Having trained 20,000 dogs and counting, we have found that puppy owners who start off on the right foot with their puppy have few to no behavior problems as their puppy becomes a dog and are happy with the relationship they have with their dog.

Let us help you take your first step to a well-trained puppy so that you too can begin experiencing all the joy, fun, laughter and love that your puppy was meant to bring into your life and home! You would love that – wouldn’t you? Remember, “Opportunity Barks!”

Jim’s  Nose to Tail Puppy Training is the culmination of these years of training into an easy, step-by-step process so that your puppy understands what you expect of him because you know how to teach him.  You empower him to be able to give you the behavior you want and you empower him to be successful at living in a human home.  The result – one awesome puppy and one happy family. 

(C) Jim Burwell 2010

Puppy Training: 5 Big Mistakes People Make When House Training

Everyone loves puppies and especially that wonderful puppy breath. But did you know that most new owners do almost everything wrong when beginning to house train their puppy?

People tend to think that a new puppy will think like a mature dog but they do not – they are simply puppies. Puppies have certain needs – not only be obedience trained, but also needs related to their food which must be high quality and needs related to their ability to understand where to go potty.

Up until the time you get your new puppy, their entire world pretty much consisted of their litter mates and the area where they were kept by the breeder.

The first thing an owner needs to do of course is to potty train their puppy. As easy as this can be, people tend to over complicate things and make it difficult on them and their new puppy.

There seems to be a common thought process amongst new puppy owners about the problems of potty training that complicates an otherwise easy process, because this thought pattern confuses the new puppy.

Here’s what new owners think about their new puppy as it relates to house training:

  1. Having accidents every day in their home is part of the potty training process – it’s just what they do.
  2. Leaving the puppy in the back yard to potty is good potty training and easy for the owner.
  3. The new puppy should be able to give them a sign or a signal when it needs to go potty.
  4. Hitting a puppy with a rolled up newspaper or magazine for potty accidents is how best to correct your new puppy.
  5. Leaving the puppy’s food and water down all day for it to eat and drink is easier for them.

These thoughts can not be further from the truth. Whether you are at your wit’s end with your new puppy, or just beginning your puppy training efforts, you must understand immediately what you need to do to help your puppy be successful now and in the future.

Be as comfortable with the trainer of your dog as you are the teacher of your children. And remember, “Opportunity Barks!”

Jim’s  Nose to Tail Puppy Training is the culmination of these years of training into an easy, step-by-step process so that your puppy understands what you expect of him because you know how to teach him.  You empower him to be able to give you the behavior you want and you empower him to be successful at living in a human home.  The result – one awesome puppy and one happy family.

Puppy Training: 15 Minutes A Day Can Avoid Adult Dog Problems

Have you ever asked “what could I have done differently with my puppy when he was a new puppy that could have made him a better dog so I wouldn’t have these adult dog behavior problems?”

Most seasoned dog trainers would agree that the earlier you begin training your puppy, the stronger the training foundation is that will provide you with that better mannered dog in their adult years.

This now brings us to the question, “How soon can I start training my new puppy to avoid potential dog problems?”
Puppies can be trained at any age – even 8 weeks. Reward-based training or positive reinforcement training is best and, if you can condition your puppy to a clicker that’s even better. There are a number of benefits to “clicker training” your new puppy. Here are a couple of good reasons:

  • • The clicker provides a consistent sound to your puppy no matter who uses it. Remember, consistency and repetition is needed in good puppy training.
  • • Unlike your voice, the clicker is a sharp, crisp non emotional sound that provides your puppy with a special and unique way to identify behaviors he performs (like sits and downs) that produces a food treat. For example, when your puppy sits, click then treat.

Follow these basic rules to keep training fun for your puppy:

  1. Be consistent in your training. Train simple come, sit and down three times daily for no longer than 2 minutes and do it the same way every single time. It doesn’t really take much time out of your schedule. Setting aside 2 minutes three times daily 2 minutes is a great start. Puppies have a short attention span and will tire and get bored quickly. That’s why we keep it short.
  2. Never, ever punish your puppy in any way, shape or form. If your puppy does not obey a command simply say wrong in a neutral tone of voice and start again. It’s really that simple.
  3. Keep your expectations in line with reality. Do not expect a young, 8 week old puppy to be able to hold a sit or a down for more than a few seconds.
  4. Be consistent with your command each time. Pick one word and stick to it. Speaking in sentences or multiple words will not be as easy for your new puppy to learn. One behavior – one command word.
  5. Begin to train around relevant distractions. For example, if you always have a house full of kids, begin training your puppy around kids once he’s learned to obey his commands only with you.
  6. As your puppy begins to learn and perform his come, sit and down commands each and every time when asked, wean him off food treats by giving him a treat every other time and then even less frequently after that. Always click when your puppy performs a behavior properly. Your clicker will eventually be replaced with praise.
  7. For those of you that do not want to use a clicker, simply use your voice by saying, “Yes!” or “Good!” followed by a food treat when your puppy performs a command.

There is a lot to learn in training a puppy. If done correctly, it can be a process filled with fun – and obedience. This begins to set that strong foundation you will need to rely on when your new puppy becomes an adult dog. The one message to take away is “consistently” set aside time every single day as described above to work your puppy.

These are just some of the basics that will help you get started on the right foot with your puppy. Puppies are very smart and learn quickly, especially when they are taught from an early age.

Jim’s  Nose to Tail Puppy Training is the culmination of these years of training into an easy, step-by-step process so that your puppy understands what you expect of him because you know how to teach him.  You empower him to be able to give you the behavior you want and you empower him to be successful at living in a human home.  The result – one awesome puppy and one happy family. 

Be as comfortable with the trainer of your dog as you are the teacher of your children. And remember, “Opportunity Barks!”

 

(C) Jim Burwell 2010
What’s your dog training question?
Use the comments below to ask me.

Your Dog Training Questions: Where Should I Socialize My Puppy?

If you have been reading my blog for a while, (or if you haven’t, hello new readers!) you know that I preach the virtues of puppy “socialization.” So what is socialization and where does it happen? It is the process of exposing your puppy to people, places, sounds, sights and smells when they are young. The idea is that this exposure, combined with consistent puppy training, will help create a confident, friendly dog that can follow your directions in a variety of settings. I have written about this subject in several blog posts, which led to one reader to ask the following:

Your Question:

Jim,

You have mentioned before how important it is to socialize young puppies by taking them to different places to experience people, smells, etc. But you have also said to not take puppies to dog parks. Isn’t this contradictory?

My Answer:

No, it’s not contradictory. Puppies are not fully vaccinated till about 4 months of age. A puppy owner must always keep in mind where their puppy is on their vaccination schedule in relation to where they take their puppy. Dog parks can have dogs there that are not vaccinated, there can be in-tact males etc. There are many other places for puppies and dogs to experience new sights, sounds, smells, noises rather than dog parks. Even for older dogs there are other places besides dog parks to get them used to all those things. There are puppy day camps and other pet resorts where vaccinations are required. There is doggie day camp, and much more.

I would simply say that owners must inspect and be comfortable with where you are sending your dog for the day just as parents would inspect and be comfortable with where they send their children. Kids can get hurt playing and so can dogs. A good day camp facility has a specific # of dogs per counselor and those counselors must be vigilant when the dogs are playing. Do not be afraid to ask questions about this and request a tour.

Also not ALL dogs are of the right temperament for day camp. Some are too shy or low energy. Each dog should be temperament tested prior to joining a day camp and the pet owner’s job is make sure you take your dog or puppy to a reputable day camp facility.

Jim’s  Nose to Tail Puppy Training is the culmination of these years of training into an easy, step-by-step process so that your puppy understands what you expect of him because you know how to teach him.  You empower him to be able to give you the behavior you want and you empower him to be successful at living in a human home.  The result – one awesome puppy and one happy family.

Remember, “Opportunity Barks!”

(C) Jim Burwell 2010

What’s YOUR dog training question?
Use the comments below to ask me.

House Training vs. House Breaking: The Difference For Puppy Training Basics

When teaching puppy potty training to new puppy owners, some professionals use the term house training and some refer to it as house breaking. So which is it? While this can seem to be confusing, it’s really not because both terms refer to the same thing: Teaching your new puppy when and where to go to the bathroom. I prefer using the term house training because it puts a kinder, softer description to the process – and more importantly, nothing gets broken – there is no breakage.

As you start the house training process it’s important to understand what exactly your new puppy needs and doesn’t need. If your puppy could speak, here is his “need list” for you:

• Consistency and repetition
• Patience and understanding
• Food treats and your love and affection
• Your undivided attention during the entire process

And, as aptly as your new puppy communicated his needs, the following would be his list of things he does not want:

• A whack on the butt with a rolled up newspaper or anything else for that matter
• A face full of his pee or poop
• Yelling and screaming

Current trends in puppy training and puppy house training teach positive methods in house training your new puppy leaving the old training methods of verbal and physical punishment behind in the dust where they belong. Be consistent with taking your puppy out for much needed potty breaks throughout the day as needed. Provide him with lots of praise and treats for going in the designated potty area. Your undivided attention to where your puppy is and what he’s doing, while in the house will allow you to catch mistakes before they happen. This, if done consistently, will begin to set him up to succeed!

Another tool to use in house training a puppy is a crate. However, some new puppy owners think this is cruel and that their puppy will think it’s being punished. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Crate training puppies has long been known to be a great way to accelerate the house training process because puppies don’t like to soil in their den. In addition to greatly assisting in the house training process, crating your puppy also helps to protect your stuff from becoming chew toys and it helps to build puppy confidence in being alone.

Puppies often take up a favorite spot under a desk or table where they can feel safe away from the hustle and bustle of a busy household. They will take up refuge there with their back to the wall so they can keep an eye out on all things going on. Dogs have been doing this for years – creating a safe den-like place away from predators. While our little fluffy domesticated puppies don’t have to worry about predators, the instincts are still there. “Denning” is an instinct which lends to make crate training easier if you start when your new puppy first gets home.

Jim’s  Nose to Tail Puppy Training is the culmination of these years of training into an easy, step-by-step process so that your puppy understands what you expect of him because you know how to teach him.  You empower him to be able to give you the behavior you want and you empower him to be successful at living in a human home.  The result – one awesome puppy and one happy family. 

(C) Jim Burwell 2010
What’s your dog training question?
Use the comments below to ask me.

Puppies: Tips For Getting A New Dog, Even An Older Dog

Thinking about getting a new dog or puppy? Generally it’s better to plan an adoption from a shelter or the purchase of a pure bred dog. But, you never know when you will happen upon a stray that tugs on your heart strings. I was surprised once. I said I would never have a new puppy again – not at my age. And then it happened. Discarded and left under a car at a nearby auto dealership, a little 8 week old black lab puppy entered our lives last August. Who could turn away this little cutie? Certainly not my wife! We named him Sammy. Now it was time, once again, to practice what I had preached all these years. You know, the midnight and two o’clock a.m. potty walks, those razor sharp puppy teeth and the list goes on. All of this is, of course, very manageable with proper instructions on training and raising a puppy.

A dog is hard work, there’s no getting around it – pure breed or otherwise. Make sure you don’t get a dog for the kids, your wife or the family, without remembering the old saying, “Dogs are not just for Christmas, Dogs are for a lifetime.” A dog is a living breathing being that needs as much love, care, attention and training as a child. You can’t just put a new puppy out in the back yard while you are at work all day. Getting a new puppy or dog requires much thought and should include the whole family not only in picking out that new dog or puppy but in the responsibility of raising this new family pet.

And deciding to get a dog congers up all kinds of questions. Should I get a puppy or an older dog? What breed will fit into my or my families’ lifestyle? Should I get a male or female? And, where should I get my dog? The list goes on.

Let’s explore these questions:

Puppy or older Dog?
Puppies are cute, highly demanding of your time with house training, not biting, chewing on proper chew items and more. It’s probably not wise to choose a puppy with children under the age of five. Adult dogs on the other hand are often housetrained and out of that “intense” chewing stage that puppies go through. Sometimes however, they come with unknown or questionable behavioral history. But don’t rule them out. You can teach an older dog new tricks; and, they will fit in with their new family as well and sometimes better than a puppy.

Breed?
Breeds have been created by man for the express purpose of accomplishing certain tasks whether it’s a sporting breed to retrieve game or a working class for specific tasks like herding. It’s generally better to get a dog that has been bred to work closely with man and not a breed that has been bred for their fighting and aggressive proficiency. I personally have had golden retrievers while my wife has enjoyed the company of retired racing greyhounds. But Boston Terriers, King Charles Spaniels, Beagles and Poodles, just to mention a few, are great dogs as well. Other things to consider are care and maintenance. The Greyhound has minimum coat care while the Poodle (standard or otherwise) requires maximum coat care. Poodles, however, don’t shed, are extremely intelligent and are great for people with allergies. As a matter of fact poodles are being bred with golden retrievers and Labrador retrievers to produce “Goldendoodles” and “Labradoodles” that are also great for those with allergies.

Male or female?
I have owned and loved both. My take on this is, regardless of gender, have your dog neutered or spayed. They stay healthier and live longer. And, whether they are male or female, all dogs are individuals with their own temperament which can range from very docile or submissive to extremely dominant.

Where do I go to get a dog?

Reputable Breeder
If a pure bred dog, go to a reputable breeder. The breeder I have gotten my golden retriever from require that I return the dog if it doesn’t work out (whatever the reason). Their best interest is for the dog. And, to the extent that they can at that young age will guarantee eyes, heart and hips (if a large breed). Of course their guarantee is that if the young pup does develop an eye, heart or hip problem, they will exchange it for another one. I personally have never been able to just “trade in” my dog to which I have bonded for another. But at least the willingness to do so is indicative of a good breeder. Our black lab Sammy developed hip dysplasia in both hips. The day we decided to take him home with us he was ours and our responsibility – in sickness and in health. So we had him fixed up and we go on down the road.

Pure-Breed Rescue Groups
These are dedicated individuals that have banded together to help foster and care for dogs of their particular breed of choice. They often times have an established website and have set up a not-for-profit organization to raise funds for medical expenses so that you will adopt a healthy disease-free dog.

Animal shelters
Great dogs can be found in your local shelter. Here in Houston we have the SPCA, CAPS and the Humane Society. A example of a great shelter dog is Radar the weather dog on KPRC-TV who was adopted from the Humane Society. The folks at the shelters are more than willing to lend a hand in helping you to determine which dog is right for you. They care for them every day and know each dog.

Word of Mouth
Sometimes people have changes in their lifestyle and professional status and can no longer care for their pet. Knowing that their pet will go to a loving home that will give them as much love and care as they did can be comforting for all concerned. Often times folks will notify their veterinarian, groomer, trainer or boarding facility of their need to re-home their beloved pet. So it pays to network as much as possible.

(C) Jim Burwell 2010

Puppy Training: Are You At The End Of Your Rope With An Aggressive Puppy?

Puppies are generally taken from the litter at 7 to 8 weeks of age. This time with its litter mates is critical as it is used to help puppies learn to read body language and signals with it’s littermates through play and interaction – signals like, let’s play or too rough!, or back off please! Good breeders do not allow their puppies to be removed from the litter too soon because they are aware of the importance of this time needed for socialization and puppy training. This helps new puppy owners from having puppy behavioral problems. BUT,good puppy training doesn’t stop here. Responsible owners wait until the optimum age to get a puppy and then immediately begin their puppy training in the home. Smaller dog breeds like terriers or toy pups should stay in the litter until 8 to 12 weeks. A little research along with the following note- worthy facts and you may have a better understanding of why your puppy is exhibiting aggressive behavior.

  • Fact: It is common to frequently see aggression develop in dogs that were removed from their mother and litter mates between the ages of 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Fact: A lack of experience in the socialization process with littermates and other puppies can lead to fearful behavior and possibly defensive aggression. Puppy training and socialization with other puppies is critical.
  • Fact: This same aggressive behavior is also seen in dogs that are brought home at 8 weeks of age but are never taken out for environmentally rich experiences like meeting and playing with other puppies and dogs, walks in parks and the neighborhood and proper training when it comes to meeting people and children.
  • Fact: These dogs automatically opt to use defensive aggressive behavior as their only tool when first communicating with other dogs.

Correcting Problem Biting with Puppies If you watch a mother pup correct her young pup she will often times start off by the least method then becomes more assertive as needed. The steps are outlined below that you can use:

  • First, simply freeze (no feedback to reinforce the biting) and in fact turn away to discourage biting.
  • The next level (with some aggressive pups) you would make a quick move towards the pup in the form of a lung as she snarls and growls – very fast and abrupt.
  • If all else is failing, use a distracting ploy. Toss a chew bone or Kong toy in front of the lunging puppy as a distraction.

There are also some topical applications to try if all else fails.

  • Bitter Apple (a topical spray) from your local pet store will some times work. You may also have to combine Bitter Apple with some of the above techniques. Apply to back of hands to prevent biting and spray on jeans or shoes if puppy is biting pant legs or shoes.

If adequate puppy training, desensitization and socialization is started as early as possible after the puppy is brought home, many puppies can learn to develop the critical social skills they need to lead productive and positive social lives interacting very well with other puppies and adult dogs. The bottom line is that you can avoid aggression and injury with these non-physical recommendations. And remember, “Opportunity Barks!” Jim’s  Nose to Tail Puppy Training is the culmination of these years of training into an easy, step-by-step process so that your puppy understands what you expect of him because you know how to teach him.  You empower him to be able to give you the behavior you want and you empower him to be successful at living in a human home.  The result – one awesome puppy and one happy family.