Control Your Dog

Dog Training Tips: Control Your Dog

Controlling your dog is one of the best dog training tips I know.  Now you may be thinking, “Yeah right. Of course I control my dog.” But do you really control your dog around the house?

See if the following sounds familiar.

“My dog is a little too excited and out of control all the time, does not follow commands and seems to have a mind of his own when I want him to pay attention to me. Often I just feel like yelling at him or I tell him to do the same thing over and over again. It doesn’t work.”

 

Control Your Dog

 

Have you set boundaries in your home to prevent this kind of bad dog behavior? Many dog owners have not.

For those dog owners, everything seems so complicated and overwhelming.  Then they wind up with their dog:

  • jumping on visitors
  • sometimes being threatening towards visitors
  • barking and waking up the baby,
  • pulling on the leash which is impossible with the stroller
  • having no self-control around food.

Why Boundaries?

Controlling your dog by setting boundaries will provide both you and your dog with valuable benefits that will last a lifetime. This is a good dog training tip to remember and implement today. You’ll be glad you did.

You’re probably asking, just what are boundaries with my dog and what do they do?

Boundaries tell your dog where he can and cannot go in your home. Boundaries like stay out of the kitchen (especially good when you are busy cooking) or out of the baby’s room are all valuable benefits if they are relevant to your needs.  If not, choose and set your own boundaries for your dog.  

 

Maybe you want your dog to stay out of the bedroom, maybe you want your dog to go lie on his dog bed when the doorbell rings.  You can set boundaries for your dog according to your needs and wants.

In order to maximize control of your dog, you should also define personal space boundaries so that he will respect your personal space unless you ask him to come into your personal space. By doing this your dog will also begin to respect the personal space of your house guests. By personal space I mean all over you on the couch, in your lap, jumping on you, laying on you etc.

These boundaries should be set the day you bring your new puppy or dog home. And, if you haven’t set any boundaries at all for your dog, it’s not too late. In fact, it’s never too late.

This is important: if you have other family members, everyone should be taught to be consistent with these new house boundaries.


Boundaries are important because your dog is living in your home – a totally different environment than he’s used to. Boundaries help you establish your leadership. And, they begin building your dog’s respect for you as you reinforce your set boundaries each and every day.  Setting and reinforcing these boundaries is not hard for you, nor are they hard ON the dog.  There is absolutely no harshness associated with helping your dog understand what to do and what not to do.

 

Dog Training Tips on Boundaries

Boundaries also provide your dog with daily rules and guidelines within which he lives. This provides him with a sort of “roadmap” to negotiate life with humans – in a human world – and in your human home.  This roadmap keeps him from being anxious about having to make decisions—that he will make like a dog

Here are some dog training tips on boundaries:

1. Only allow your dog into your personal space (see above) when invited. Require him to sit before asking him in.

2. Only allow your dog on your furniture (if permitted) when invited. Require him to sit before asking him up.

3. Require your dog to sit while you go up and down stairs and in and out doors and gates, etc. and release him to come out or in after you. This also provides you with an extra margin of safety on perimeter doors and gates once he begins to comply.

4. Do 3, two minute dog training  lessons a day to give your dog a sense of working for you and listening to you. It will pay big dividends down the road.

5. Use a leash in the house to reinforce your new boundaries until your dog is trained to respect them.  A leash gives you control and gives you the ability to stop him from doing something without being physical with your dog.
Boundaries and guidelines  will keep your dog’s stress to a minimum. Less stress means less dog behavior problems

 

“Sharing is Caring”  Let me know below—–Does your dog understand boundaries in your home?

 

“Together, We Can Raise a Happy and Obedient Dog”

Jim Burwell, professional dog trainer for 25+ years, serving 8500+ clients,  has a profound understanding of dog behavior and the many things, we as humans, do that influence that behavior – good or bad.  Jim has the ability to not only steer dogs and puppies down the right path but to also train the owners to understand their part in having a great dog.  His Ground Rules for Great Dogs is the culmination of these years of training into an easy, step-by-step way to teach your dog how to be a great family member.

2 replies
  1. leila_admin
    leila_admin says:

    Stephanie thanks for your comment. You’re both right in your own ways. Best solution is a combination of what you both think. Yes your son needs to begin to be responsible for
    the puppy. However ANY interaction between children and dogs must be monitored by an adult so there are no failures. So let your son be responsible but always with adult supervision.

    One thing that will help you is to go back to our site and read the blog post on having a leash on your puppy in the home when you are there to supervise. Your puppy would not be
    able to pounce, charge and bite his clothing if the leash is on and attached to you. Then you do not have to keep them separate. Also it sounds like taking a look at our Ground Rules
    for a GReat Dog would be a huge asset to you. We talk about leadership not dominance as being a leader to your dog makes a huge difference in your relationship with your dog. It
    fosters a relationship of mutual trust and respect. Dogs and puppies simply need to be taught and to understand HOW to live in our world. Ground Rules makes that easy

    Hope this helps

  2. Stephanie
    Stephanie says:

    Hi!

    We are a 12 week goldendoodle puppy owner! I am loving all your blog posts, facebook advce etc! Recently our main struggle has been teaching our puppy control around our 7 yr old son. She pounces, charges, (only time she barks) and bites his clothing, skin etc. She sees him as an equal, playmate. We have been working to stop it, teaching Leave it, and I have been watching her like a hawk, to prevent her even getting to that point with him. But keeping them separted for long periods of time is a challenge. Also, our main point of contention between hubby & I ,- is that he thinks it’s ok to just let my son take the puppy out, it’s “his responsibility” to help care for the dog. I do agreee- but after reading many of your other posts, I see that bascially, it’ should only be done with our supervsion, during this training period. Until she has learned my son is in control and dominant over her as well. Can you please help settle this dispute? I feel he thinks I am overreacting, and that a 7 yr old can & should be allowed to take a puppy out. Am I overreacting?

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