On Dog Behavior: Is Your Dog Over Protective?

Do you ever wonder – is your dog over protective?  Some people like their dog to be over protective because it gives them a sense of being protected and secure. The dilemma comes when their dog is being over protective with the wrong people. Visits from friends begin to dwindle.

An over protective dog can often become a problem and a liability

overprotective dogSIZED 265x300 On Dog Behavior: Is Your Dog Over Protective?

 

The problem with an over protective dog is that it can significantly limit your enjoyment of your dog in normal, every day circumstances like when you have house guests. And you certainly can’t take your dog out in public.

Not very many people like to walk into a home to visit a friend only to be confronted with a dog that growls, snaps or worse yet, bites. And, the bigger the dog, the worse the threat. A dog bite from any size dog creates a potential liability on many levels. It can create lawsuits, loss of friendships and can get you and your dog, a reputation you never ever wanted.

Then you’ve got to consider the embarrassment factor as well. You have to admit it’s pretty embarrassing to have to pick up your barking dog or try to somehow restrain your big dog to keep your house guest from being jumped on or worse.

Often times this necessitates crating, gating or putting your dog in the back yard so that you can enjoy your visit. This many times creates non-stop barking which can quickly become a nuisance and also spoil the visit. Your dog quickly begins to dislike visitors because every time a visitor comes over, he gets the boot. Get the picture?

Most friends don’t know how to handle these kinds of awkward and anxious dog situations so they avoid the visit altogether. To them staying away from your home keeps them safe.  Now that’s a bummer.

A better alternative

Wouldn’t you agree the better scenario would be to have your visitor greeted by your tail-wagging, non-jumping happy dog?   Being able to enjoy your friends along with “the company of your nice dog” that sits comfortably by your feet or on the couch next to you has got to be a much better alternative to a growling, biting and over protective dog.  

What creates an over-protective dog in the first place?

Many people get a dog to satisfy their own personal needs. Did you? Did you get your dog to have a companion to love on, be affectionate with and be with you all the time?

If your answer is yes, that’s okay. It’s okay as long as you put structure in your dog’s life so there is a fair and equitable balance of needs. In other words, if your dog wants on the couch with you, he should sit. If he wants love and affection, he should sit. In fact he should sit to earn everything including his food. Otherwise the relationship you have with your dog becomes lop-sided because nothing is earned – it’s all free to your dog.

What does this have to do with you and your dog? Constant free doting and petting satisfies your own personal needs with no thought given to how your dog is interpreting the interaction with you.

Over time the lack of structure or inconsistent structure begins to affirm in your dogs mind that you are a valuable provider of good things for free. Many dogs begin to guard things of high value; i.e. YOU. An over protective dog is born. Is that your dog?

It starts off with guarding you and then often times can and does extend to the house and yard. Here is another common owner mistake:

When your dog is allowed to run the fence line in the back yard, the gate across the driveway or the bay window in the front living room barking at dogs and people, he is able to rehearse territorial aggression. This all begins to complicate greetings at the front door.

And if you have a dog that is fearful because of a lack of socialization to people, that too can further complicate your over protective dog situation.

What to do?

They say that hind sight is 20/20. That always seems to be the starting point when dealing with dog behavior problems. Fixing an already over protective dog problem requires going back historically in the relationship with your dog to understand what caused your dog’s behavior problem in the first place.

In this case, no structure and too much unearned love and affection over time created your dog’s symptoms of growling, barking and over protectiveness. It was his way of protecting you as his valuable possession from intruders (your visitors.)

Changing how you view your relationship with your dog so that you begin doing the right things can allow you to start seeing improvements almost immediately.

What are the right things? Controlled, structured walks for exercise and exploring, learn-to-earn program (sit for everything) and regular dog obedience training sessions 3 times daily for only 2 minutes are all a good start to showing your dog a “different you.”

How protective your dog is will determine whether dog behavior modification exercises will be needed to put the final touches on your newly improved happy dog.

I’m always curious about your input – it’s important to me.  Do you deal with this scary situation in your house?

“Together, We Can Raise a Happy and Obedient Dog”

 Jim Burwell, Houston dog trainer for 25+ years, serving over 9000 clients, has a profound understanding of dog behavior and the many things, we as humans, do that influence that behavior – good or bad.  Jim has the ability to not only steer dogs and puppies down the right path but to also train the owners to understand their part in having a great dog.
 
His Ground Rules for Great Dogs is your must have, easy step-by-step process to helping your dog. Be the dog owner your dog needs to be a great dog.  Ground Rules gets you there. Grab them now.

 

About Jim Burwell

Jim Burwell is one of Houston’s most established and thriving dog trainers. His at home dog training process constitutes the culmination of 30 years of experience teaching canines of virtually all breeds — and educating their owners.

Comments

  1. I have to put my dog in the bedroom anytime anyone comes over. I just thought that was the way he was

  2. Rebecca, it certainly doesn’t have to be. Just realize what you need to do to change it

  3. Caroline Cottingham says:

    Hi I have a beautiful German Shepard bitch
    Who is 18 months old. She is obedient in all ways
    With the exception of over protection. Before I got married she lived with just me and my two kids, now I’m married my husband has a lot of friends over and her over protective nature is causing problems. I can get her to lay down but she still barks. If people come in and sit down she is fine and loving. But when people stAnd up to leave she go’s back in to guard mode. Please help as I want her to be happy and stable and enjoy life. Thank you for your time. Caroline

  4. Caroline. I don’t have enough info to fix this Caroline, but behavior issues are almost always related back to the relation ship with the owner. Take a look at
    my Ground Rules for Great Dogs as that’s an easy, non-confrontational way to help you dog understand the you, the humans have everything under control

    Here’s the link: http://www.petiquettedog.com/ground-rules-great-dogs/

  5. I have a rescued romanian street dog he is amazing in every way but very protective of me and the children and displays aggressive barking tenancies to visitors and passers by. I have two other dogs who are fine and generally they all get on well.
    Bearing in mind Major has suffered hardship and this can explain some of his behavior, his potential to bite is high and he intimidates people who come to visit. I have to put him on a lead if repair men enter and he reacts strongly if my parents go to hug my children.
    I am not able to walk him at the moment as I am waiting for some injuries he suffered in Romania to heal, ( he was shot and lost his front leg and his corresponding back leg has been badly broken but that was an older injury) but I correct him every time. The best way, I have found, is to place him in a submissive position on the floor and say no firmly. I have asked people not to shout as this makes his barking worse. However, as soon as I leave the room he starts again. I have attempted to ascertain his level of aggressiveness by rolling him on his back and leaning over. Nothing, totally submissive and avoided eye contact as expected no aggression shown until I leave the room and leave visitors alone or the peace and routine is disturbed by visitors. Once he gets used to a person he is fine but I am concerned that some poor person won’t be able to get to know him and will get bitten instead! I don’t really understand why he is so protective and barky as I am not a nervous person and neither do I treat my dogs as 4 legged people. They have order, are made to sit for meals and treats and all move off the sofa or bed when I tell them to. The only issue on this is they are more quick to obey me rather than other people, but the labrador is responsive to all family members.
    I am getting no where with the barking and the protective aggression and really need some advice. Please help!!!

  6. Siobhan

    Hi and thanks for your inquiry. The very first thing I would do is to stop “alpha rolling” your dog. I would focus on 3 areas with your dog: 1.) Put more consistent structure into his life; 2.) work on better obedience around people and; 3.) do situational behavioral set-ups that teach your dog alternative behaviors that you can praise and treat. If you are in my service area I could set up a program for you and work one-on-one with you and your dog. If not, I do tele-coaching as well. Resources for you: http://www.petiquettedog.com/telecoaching/

    or http://www.petiquettedog.com/ground-rules-great-dogs/

  7. Hi,
    I’m curious as to whether this is what I am experiencing with my dog or not. On walks, he barks at other dogs who come past. At first, I thought he was dog aggressive, but then today I realised he’s not actually wanting to get to the dogs, he straddles my feet if I stand still and barks in their direction – maybe a warning to stay away? If they get close, he lunges at them. If I stand still, he gets himself between me and the other dog in whichever way he can. If we see another dog coming towards us, he pulls at the end of his lead and tries to get to it until it comes past and then he’s fine – he just keeps checking behind to make sure it’s gone. He squeals and barks and makes some really odd noises too! This is the only philosophy I have found that makes sense. As, after a around 5 walks, he learns to trust most dogs (with some it takes longer than others) and will be fine. We take him to dog socialisation and training classes religiously and he is absolutely fine – he’s extremely well behaved and good natured with the other dogs (even ones he doesn’t know) until we get outside and then he starts barking and carrying on again! We even managed to adopt another dog. It took three days for him to get used to her being here and now he’s wonderful with her. However, despite all these measures and our constant efforts to socialise him, his behaviour to other dogs never improves. Do you think this could be the problem? He’s fine with people and loves it when they come to the house. I’ve never had a problem with him and other people. I’m very confused.

  8. Sometimes it’s a matter of your dog is simply on a leash and that can make him act differently. If you are holding the leash tight, loosen it. Allow hime
    to slowly, bit by bit get closer to the dog, praising at all times.

  9. Help!! My dog is mostly/only aggressive towards my husband!! We had her since she was only 8 weeks old. She is a full blood dogue de bordeaux & in fact my husband dud most if her training!! Yet, she growls and barks if he touches me, kisses me, yell at our kids ect. Yet I can yell or spank my kids and she won’t even stand up. The minute he raises his voice she I s ready to go!! She is fine with visitors (since there isn’t much contact or yelling with company). She just acts out against him who is alpha. He works long hours & doesn’t spend as much time with her, but he does feed her, walk her, play with her, correct her. What should we do???

  10. Michelle: Not enough information on your relationship with your dog but let me ask you this: How do you spend your time with your dog? And, how much love and affection do you and the kids give your dog?

  11. Michael Burton says:

    I have two bulldogs. One I have had for four years, the other about 5 months. The newer dog was two when I got her and I am unsure of her background. She is very sweet but lately has become protective of us towards our other dog. In fact, it has gotten so bad that our original dog goes out of the way to avoid her because she jumps on him. The fights are happening more and more often. Neither dog has gotten hurt in a fight yet, I think its more posturing but the new dog is definitely asserting dominance which is taking atoll on original dog. First thing I did is not allow the new dog to sleep on the bed any more. She now sleeps on the floor. I am also going to start making her work for food. I normally feed them at same time without incident. I think I am going to make the new dog sit a few times for the food. Aside from this, she has had no other aggression and nothing towards people. Any additional suggestions?

  12. Leila Martin says:

    Michael: Go read this article, and grab the free recording of the hour long class Jim did on this. Here is the link:

    http://www.petiquettedog.com/dog-behavior/why-dogs-fight-or-whats-with-sibling-rivalry/

  13. My Rottweiler has a problem with overprotection. He’s generally nice to people and other dogs, but whenever I am sitting down and someone is approaching me, he will growl and bark. Also, whenever I am in my bedroom and someone goes towards it, he gets very overprotective. A few times he did this little thing where he actually put his mouth around the other persons hand. He didn’t bite down, but it was like a warning. Like I said, he’s a very friendly dog, but whenever I am sitting and someone approaches or whenever I am in my bedroom and someone approaches, he can get nasty.

  14. Hi Jake

    Thanks for commenting. You have a dog that is doing what we call “resource guarding” and you—are his best resource. In other words you are his property. This is created
    by owners when there is not enough structure in the home as far as what the dog thinks is his responsibility.

    If you go here you can read about it more and find your solution http://www.petiquettedog.com/ground-rules-great-dogs/

  15. My 2 year old Boxer/Beagle mix “Snoopy” has always been protective of her home and family but since our son was born a year ago she’s gotten much worse. When people come over she howls and growls and barks for quite a while before finally calming down. When people walk down the street in front of our house she does the same thing, and often follows them. She doesn’t do it with everybody though. Its like she senses a threat only from certain people and we don’t understand why. I can’t take her for walks anymore and recently when we boarded her we were told that she got into a corner and growled whenever they came near her. She had been there before and never had a problem, but this time they felt the need to videotape her, which upset me. Just today when I let her out to potty she ran to the front of the house and started howling at a woman with a dog and spooked her so bad she picked the dog up and rushed down the street. I feel so bad about it. We have always just assumed she’s protective of us because we’re “her people”, but I admit its becoming embarrassing. She has never attacked anyone. Never bitten anyone. She generally just lets them know she’s not happy with them and eventually backs off, but I do worry that someone will see her as a nuisance and report her.

  16. Andrea: It sounds like you have not only a fearful dog but a dog who feels the need to guard what she thinks is hers. First thing I would tell you is to absolutely
    not let her out front where she can leave your property. You are setting your dog up to fail.

    Find a positive reinforcement trainer in your area and begin working on this asap—it will not get better on its own.

  17. Hi,

    I have a lab and she is about a year and a half years old. She has never been really overprotected until we were at a dog park and another dog came up to us aggressively and tried to attack. The whole event scared her pretty badly. Now she is okay when people come over it doesn’t bother her, but when my best friend brings her dog over she has now gotten aggressive. I put her in her crate for just a minute or so and she calms down and is totally fine for the rest of the visit. Now she has gotten a new dog and my dog, Luna, just won’t warm up. She is constantly on guard barking and baring teeth. We work together everyday on her training, so I don’t know what else to do! I would love some help!!

    Thanks,

    Amanda

  18. Tim romansky says:

    My dog barks at everyone Walking by my. Truck when I’m in it…iv watched him from around the corner.doesn’t bark at anyone but as soon as I open the door he starts…I’ve walked him to the local store and tie him up while I go in.he’s fine wont bark or bother anyone.. As soon as I come out and take his leash he goes crazy barking at people..

  19. Could be some resource guarding.

  20. My dog barks at everybody that comes to my home, she jumps up and down. The only way I can get her to calm Down is put her in the kitchen and ignore her until she finally tires herself out what can I do.

  21. David Cook says:

    Hi Jim,
    Your website is awesome! I’m going to read it further. My wife and I have a 6 year old black lab/border collie cross rescue dog from the SPCA. In our pack my wife is top dog, our cat 2nd fiddle and Rufus and I are duking it out for 3rd.. In general Rufus is great. FYI I use a power wheelchair and have limited arm function and strength. Rufus is a high-energy dog who likes and needs lots of exercise.

    I take Rufus out almost all the time whenever I go out. In the winter months, that’s less but we do get out once a day. I think he’s over-protective and barks at people, especially men and he really barks at homeless people walking by on the sidewalk.

    This behavior is relatively new, for about a year and is getting worse. I’m worried he might bite someone and we’ll have to put him down. He only does it with me.

    I take a pouch of very tasty liver ‘Big Bite’ treats which gets his attention right away. I praise him when he’s good and don’t always give him a treat but always verbally praise him with a higher/happier tone of voice. I try to position myself between the person approaching and Rufus but some times I can’t.

    I’m at my wits end. Please pass on any advice you might have for Rufus and I. Thank you very much!

  22. Hi David, thanks for the nice compliments. Your dog appears to have claimed “ownership” of you. Here’s an article I wrote that should help you

    http://www.petiquettedog.com/dog-behavior/dog-behavior-dog-protective/

    Jim

  23. Rick Santiago says:

    My parents rescued a dog a few months ago. And since then he has become very attached to my mother. Now, he does not see me or any other adults as threats.
    But, when it comes to my 3 & 4 year old he growls at them and bares his teeth. He has also “Nipped” and bit them on occasion just for stand near my mother. One incident which just occurred yesterday.
    My mother was sitting in the kitchen had asked my son to come over to her. Not noticing the dog was hovering near her, under the kitchen table, she went to pick up my son and the dog lunged out and bit or “nipped” (as she put it) my son on the arm. Causing my son to scream and cry and mother to say “oh but he didn’t bite just nipped.”
    My wife no longer wants to visit my parents for fear that the dog will again bite one of the kids.

    My kids absolutely love the dog as the dog is very friendly. listens to kids well when they tell him to sit and lay down. We are not really sure what to do about this situation. This only happens with my 3 and 4 year old.

    I have a 1 year old that does not faze the dog at all, even when my 1 year old is around my mother. My 3 and 4 year old seem like a threat to him.

    Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

    Dog – Benji
    Age – According to VET – Less than 2yrs
    Breed/s – Beagle/Lab Mix

  24. Rick: the answer is in the article. your dog needs to understand that your mother is not his property. He is resource guarding and without structure, and rules
    as I speak about it won’t change.

  25. joanne colombo says:

    I adopted a terrier mix two weeks ago. his owner died and he was in a shelter for a year. he is a great dog with me, very sweet. in walking him he will bark at every person as far as he can see. looks like he looks for them. the last two day I have noticed that he is good if someone comes in the house. but if they get too close to me he will lung at then , bark and try to bite them. I realize that he has some abandonment problems, and he is procting me or he doesn’t want anyone else to like me in fear maybe he will lose or they will hurt me, I need to fix this fast!. I live in senior housing and if he bites anyone he will have to leave. my heart would break for him…..

  26. Joanne: This will help you understand what is going on: http://www.petiquettedog.com/dog-behavior/dog-love-dog-problems/

  27. My dog Wilson who’s nearly 3 is completely docile and non aggressive when out on walks,plays with other dogs and obeys my every word but when indoors in my house or my mums goes nuts when the door goes,he is so boucy when people enter that i end up putting him in another room.I have to close I’m in the living room when I go out because the postman is scared of him.its becoming a real problem as I’m scared he might bight someone given the chance ? :(

  28. Leila Martin says:
  29. My dog (5 yr old Springer) is very territorial. We can’t pet him when he’s in his bed he’ll bare his teeth and snap at us. I’ve barred him from sleeping under my desk because if I try to pet him there he’ll do the same as if he’s in his bed. Today, when my husband was leaving for work he leaned in to kiss me and the dog barred his teeth and snapped at him. We immediately shooed the dog out of the room and he went and hid in a corner. How do we stop this from happening, I’d hate to have to put him down, he can be a real sweet and loving dog.

  30. Sue: Thanks for commenting. In the article I give many, very specific steps to take to help you with your dog’s “protectiveness”. Based on your comment, your
    dog is under the impression he is running the show and that’s because inadvertently you have told him that. Pls. re-read the article and start working on the
    things I talk about.
    Jim

  31. Sue: get a positive reinforcement trainer to come help you get your dog back on track. I will tell you that you can not separate a dog’s behavior from the
    behavior of the owners. This means you all are giving your dog multiple messages that he is the leader. In a dog’s world the leader gets to claim space etc.

    Change your behavior with your dog and your dog’s behavior will change.

  32. Hi I have a 3 year old staffy cross whippet rescue dog he is a very friendly loving dog we have had him about 3 months now he love home life the problem is that he has become very protective over our two children when they are sat playing or watching tv he feels the need to be sat over them or next to them playing he is fine when friends and family come to visit and shows no agression towards them and wil letvthem enter the house and be around our children without any fuss but when I go to move him away he is becoming more reluctant to move and has growled at me on a few occasions when this happens I send him to his bed and close the baby gate I have that separates him from the livingroom he seems to realise that he has done wrong but it doesnt seem to stop tge behaviour do u please have any suggestions or advice to stop this behaviour

  33. Emma: thanks for your comment. Pls. go back to the original blog post you read and look toward the bottom of the article. I give you several specific things
    to do And I refer to to specific articles to understand How to do those things.

  34. Karin Hencken says:

    Hi, I am loving all these answers.
    I adopted a Yorkie in September. He has bonded with everyone, especially me. At the beginning he was great with people at door etc. His only issue was growling at my husband when he tries to get in bed with me. Now it has escalated. and yes he does run up and down the fence barking at walking dogs- we live right next to a nature sanctuary with a walking path! So he just bit a friend when my son was walking him yesterday, and his barking is getting out of control.

    I can start walking him more regularly but what about the yard? He loves it back there and sometimes I need to let him out instead of walking!

    Help! I am really upset about the biting of a neighbor. also my husband is angry about the growling in bed. And during the day, he will jump up on the couch and snuggle with my husband.

    I interact with my dog, Piper by snuggling, walking, training- come, sit, stay, etc.

    help~! thank you, Karin

  35. Karin, did you click on any of the links in this article. I linked to other articles about being a leader to your dog as too much unearned love and affections is getting
    you what you’ve got. No fence fighting—PERIOD. You are allowing him to make decisions that he should not be making.

  36. I adopted a 5 yr old dog about 1 yr ago. So I don’t know his history. When he’s hanging out with my partner on the sofa and I come close or touch my partner the dog jumps at me and has bitten me a few times. He also become pertective of our other dog. He’s a little 8lb dog and I tell him no and give him a time out. I’m afraid to be to loud or scoled him. I don’t want him to think he’s not in a safe place. I sometimes think he was in a house with domestic violence. I’m lost at how to handle this situation. Other that that he’s a great dog

  37. Jim Burwell says:

    Travis: In the article you read I mentioned specific steps to do and also directed you to other articles with specific steps. Those steps do work. So please try them

  38. jessica says:

    i have a miniture wiener dog he is about 3 or 4 years old i got him from a friend who didnt have enough time for him he lives with me at my home its just me and him he loves attention and visitors and is very friendly but when its just the 2 of us at the house he will bark at any little noise he hears and when we visit my bf who he loves very much he gets excited to they play and everything problem being if my bf or anyone for that matter touch me or attempt to touch me he goes crazy and tries to bite them what can i do other then that he is great with people just as long as they dont come near me

  39. Jim Burwell says:

    Jessica – thanks for commenting. In the article Is Your Dog Over Protective which you comment comes from, at the end of the article I give very very specific steps
    With links to articles to tell you how to begin to fix this.

  40. Hi,

    I have a 2.5 year old yorkie-poo. She protects whomever she is being held by or cuddling with. She barks and snarls aggressively if the person near her is approached, even if the person approaching is a favored family member? She doesn’t behave this way when being walked and approaching strangers, which is odd. Any suggestions?

  41. Jim Burwell says:

    Beth: She is doing what we call resource guarding. She has been taught that you all belong to her and she is guarding you. Pls. go back and re-read the article and
    do the suggestions I make. I also in that article, refer you to several Other of my articles with more “how-to’s”. The solution is there, you have to make the changes.

  42. My dog was raised on the “nothing in life is free” method of training; he’s always had a huge amount of structure and consistency in his life. He sits and stays before being fed. He doesn’t get to play when he demands it; he has to wait for me to request it. He knows to stop when I say we’re done playing. He has been crate trained and sees his kennel as a positive place (enjoys napping there, sleeps there at night voluntarily, etc). He has gotten more nervous and fearful as he ages, though, and that has resulted in two recent (bad) behaviors: 1. When someone knocks on the door when we are not home, he melts down and gets destructive, even when kenneled in his “safe spot” far away from the door. It’s totally based out of fear/anxiety and not boredom, so toys don’t help. 2. He has gotten very dog-aggressive whenever a dog is close to him. He doesn’t pursue dogs to hurt them; he just wants dogs to stay out of his (and my) personal bubble, and will snarl/growl or try to chase them away when they get into it. He has a great recall and will immediately return to me if I tell him to, but it kind of hampers our ability to meet new dogs or hang out with people who also have dogs. As someone who has raised her dogs with consistent structure, I’m totally lost as to what to do. Help!

  43. Jim Burwell says:

    Jay-El: I would have your dog checked for any medical conditions. It that is all clear then hire an experienced dog trainer to come help you. I can’t fix
    something like this via email.

  44. My mom and I rescued a 5 year old yellow lab about 9 months ago. All we know about her is that she was left in a cage most of the time (the owners didn’t have time for her). Based on her papers, it does appear she spent some time overseas (UK stamps on the paper work).

    When we tried petting her, she would shy away. When you tried touching her elbows, paws, or back end, she would snap (we have to get the vet to cut her nails). When getting too close while she was eating a treat, she would snarl. She has been found to eat her feces. She was afraid of anything that clicked (such as a new color going on because hers was a little too tight). She was jumping on furniture.

    On day 2 I had her going in to a cage on request without issues and staying off the couch. She was terrified of a dog bed, but she absolutely loves her bed now.

    I have been able to get her past most of these issues. I have taught her many things such as sit and giving her paw. I can even take a treat away from her.

    She will go through times when she is very ‘needy’ for attention, which she has to sit to receive and we let her know when it is time to go lay down (and we will call her over to get some ‘loving’).

    She is sometimes aggressive towards other dogs. A couple of months ago I had a monitored meet-n-greet with a relative’s dog. It took about 30 minutes, but we were able to get them past things when his female dog submitted.

    While walking her last night, as we got closer to a neighbor walking her dog, she barked (while not pulling too hard). The other dog did submit (and hid behind his owner). My dog sat down across the front of me. I stepped back from the owner and we continued talking. At this point the dogs were able to get nose-to-nose without aggressive behavior.

    Will I need to continue doing this to introduce her to other dogs, or is there a better way?

    Also, how can I stop my dog from eating her feces? The vet said she is healthy in every other way. Now that the snow has melted I can clean up my yard, but Winter will return.

  45. Jim Burwell says:

    Patti: thanks for commenting. I don’t have enough information to give you guidance through your blog comment. I do video coaching, tele-coaching and of course
    in-home lessons if you live in Houston. Happy to help you in any of these ways.

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