dog behavior with Jim Burwell

Way Too Much Crate Time

 

Here’s your wake-up call! Quit creating dog behavior problems with too much crate time.

 

 

Over crating can create dog behavior problems

 

You may not even realize what you’re doing! Jane didn’t.

Jane called complaining about several different problems.

They all had one common link. Way too much crate time.

How much is too much?

Dogs Crated All Day While You’re At Work – Is too Much Crate Time

If you are one of these dog owner’s, here’s a question for you:

What if I told you that making one single change that could produce the “best dog you’ve ever had?”

Jane didn’t believe me either.

Jane’s Dogs and The Problem Behaviors She Faced

Jane has two medium sized rescue dogs that are high energy and big chewers. Her dogs also like to play rough with each other and her.
They play way too rough for Jane.

Her dogs stay in a spare bedroom and their crates are in that room. Jane and her husband have the rest of the house.

The dogs interact a lot with Jane in that room and during backyard playtime and on walks.
She and he husband wanted them in the rest of the house with them but didn’t know how to begin the integration.

They are rowdy and destructive. They chew the sofa pillows, cushions and window sill woodwork. Just some of the problems.

More often than not, they are crated in their room while Jane and her husband relax in the rest of the house.

The List of Her Dog Problems

Jane wants to fix:

  1. Pulling on leash
  2. Fighting with each other on walks when people on roller-blades or bicycles go past.
  3. Unruliness
  4. Charging, jumping and nipping at house guests
  5. Destructive chewing of their beds and sofa in the dog room if left alone.

We talked about her goals and how/when she interacted with her dogs.

I began to jot down a “timeline” to get a better look at when her dogs were crated and when they were out.

It was an eye-opener for Jane.

We added all the hours in the crate during the work day, in the evenings and on weekends and sleeping at night.

It was clear why her dogs were out of control.

All this stored up energy was not being managed well.

The Point of Too Much Crate Time

I determined that most of Jane’s dog behavior problems stemmed from way too much crate time.

When you get a dog, it is your responsibility to teach, train and shape the behaviors “you want” from your dog.

Most of this fell on Jane.

Families may have one person that likes dogs and the other doesn’t. Maybe they work long hours and don’t want to engage with the dogs.

Defaulting to crating for your own peace and calm instead of teaching and training good manners is not the solution.

Commit the necessary time to teaching and training good manners “out of the crate” has more proven benefits. Realize it. Make it happen.

Jane Made it Happen for Her Dogs

I suggested the following for Jane’s dog fix:

  • Break up week day crate time using dog walkers 1-2 times a day.
  • Before work, commit to getting up earlier for a before breakfast walk with dogs
  • Legal and motivational chew toys they love will keep them busy while with Jane in her part of the house.
  • Put dogs on a learn-to-earn program: sit for everything they want; food, affection, etc.
  • 2-minute obedience training sessions with each dog individually doing rapid-fire sits and downs to work on leadership and create mental fatigue.
  • Jane changed her dog’s diet to a grain-free diet with no corn, soy, sugar, etc.

Once Jane got her dogs integrated into her part of the house, she worked on door manners.

Jane has completely changed her lifestyle with her dogs.

She realizes the consequences of not having taken that critical responsibility at the beginning.

They are all much happier and her dogs no longer have to be crated in their own room when Jane is home. No stress and lots of legal and motivational chew toys, no chewing.

It’s a lifestyle change that is well worth the extra effort. Try it!

Together We Can Raise A Happy and Obedient Dog

You got your dog for a reason. You wanted to share your life with a happy and loving dog. But now, your dog has big problems and life is not happy.

I can help you get that happy, well behaved dog back. We’ll work together at your speed and both you and your dog will have fun every step of the way.

 

2 replies
  1. Jim Burwell
    Jim Burwell says:

    Food is put down 2x a day for fifteen minutes then picked up and put down again at meal times. You are allowing Jack to make the rules. That’s creating problems already right?

  2. Allison M. Brandt
    Allison M. Brandt says:

    You have helped me with my Maltese, Jack. I have a problem having Jack eat for me.
    My housekeeper usually feeds Jack in the kitchen with his leash. When she’s not here, should I just put the food down in the kitchen or my study and let him eat it when he’s hungry, without his leash? I have a feeling he’s controlling me and I do not know how to change his behavior.

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