5 Reasons Dog Training Fails

5 Reasons Why Dog Training Fails

There are basically 5 reasons why dog training fails with some dog owners.

In my 30 years of dog training, I have presented plans, worked with dog owners to resolve their dog behavior problems, have had many successes and have seen owners struggle and sometimes fail with a good dog training plan.

Dog training failures can be inter-related to one or more of the other 4 reasons. They all wind up being factors contributing to the ultimate failure of a dog training program.

Lets take a look at some reasons why dog training fails AND solutions or explanations This should help you better understand each reason if/when you are ever faced with a dog problem of your own.

 

5 Reasons Dog Training Fails

 

Failure reason #1: The dog’s behavior has not produced enough pain, embarrassment, frustration or stress to motivate the dog owner to fix it.

Solution/explanation: This is one of those sticky situations where dog training fails “even before it begins” because this owner makes excuses like, “He’s just a puppy. He’ll grow out of it.” Be proactive and stop it before it gets worse. Call a competent trainer now – not later.

Failure reason #2: A dog owner is not truly committed to keeping the dog and fixing the problem. There is “conditional acceptance.”

Solution/explanation: Your dog can read you like a book and knows by your energy how you feel about him. Don’t say, “I’ll only keep him if he stops soiling in my house,” or “If this doesn’t get fixed, he’s out of here!” Instead, make the commitment to unconditionally keep your dog – no matter what.

Failure reason #3: As far as the owner is concerned, there is something wrong with their dog – and that the program will be centered on the dog’s behavior.

Solution/explanation: All behavior problems exhibited by dogs are stress-related and directly traceable back to the relationship between the owner and the dog. It’s always something the owner “is” or “is not” doing. The more you know about how your emotions influence your dog and how stress is created in your dog’s mind, the better you will appreciate the value of a good plan to fix your dog problem.

Failure reason #4: No consistency in working a plan to resolve their dog behavior problem. Often times I find that owners get lazy, put it off to the last minute or just don’t do the work at all. Sometimes owners tend to take an “ala carte” approach; that is, pick and choose the easy parts and avoid the challenging and critical work.

Solution/explanation: Be true to yourself and fair to your dog. Work the entire plan. Usually each part of the plan relies on the cumulative work done on all parts. Consistency and repetition breed habit in dogs. Consistently and repetitively work the plan – all of it.

Failure reason #5: Not enough one-on-one exercise and obedience training with their dog. Dog walkers and big back yards tend to be more convenient.

Solution/explanation: Today time seems to be an even more precious commodity than even last year. We have less of it and often times are selfish with the free time we do have. If you have made a commitment to own a dog, he deserves his fair and equal share of free time with you. Use it wisely to consistently exercise with your dog and do regular obedience training with your dog.

The benefits of this planned time together can keep your dog’s stress and anxiety down and eliminate behavior problems. More quality time with your dog means less stress and less behavior problems. More is less.

Dog training and fixing your dog’s problems in no more or no less than anything else in life; your results are directly related to the amount of time, attention, and perseverance you put into it. Throw some love towards your dog into the mix also.

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“Together, We Can Raise a Happy and Obedient Dog”

Jim Burwell, professional dog trainer for 25+ years, serving 8500+ clients, has a profound understanding of dog behavior and the many things, we as humans, do that influence that behavior – good or bad. Jim has the ability to not only steer dogs and puppies down the right path but to also train the owners to understand their part in having a great dog.

His Ground Rules for Great Dogs is the culmination of these years of training into an easy, step-by-step process so that your dog understands what you expect of him, you empower him to be able to give you the behavior you want and you empower him to be successful at living in a human home.

1 reply
  1. Bruce
    Bruce says:

    Oh man. I saw myself in at least 3 of these scenarios. I think I knew it was doing this stuff but until I ready your blog post and saw it in black and white did I not acknowledge it.

    Thanks a lot for the kick in the pants – I really need it.

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